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Even though I have used Windows Vista for several years, I had my first occasion to look at the Recently Changed folder after reading a article about the Favorites area.

I was astonished to discover 1,706 files in that folder dating back two months. I was excited to discover that the music files locked within PowerPoint presentations sent to me by email and the videos also sent by email, were right there so I could save them to my computer. I have looked for a way to do that for years!

I tried searching for more information about this folder [does it have a maximum size? or a "destroy by" date?] and wasn't successful. Each photo in PPTs, web sites, etc. seemed to be there in that Recently Changed folder.

Does anyone have information about this folder? While I really, really like finding the music files and knowing that there is a backup for stuff I thought I had deleted, I know this folder must take up a huge amount of space. I regularly empty all files names Temporary and thought I was keeping my hard drive lean and mean...this is a total surprise.

Any information on this?




A couple of months ago, I upgraded from Windows Vista x64 to Windows 7 Home Premium x64 and it's been really good. But I now seem to have this folder under Windows Explorer>Favorites> Recently Changed along with a shortcut on the taskbar. A lot of things keep going in this folder that I've viewed like photos, documents, pdf files...and if I try and delete or clear things out, then they permanently get deleted. When I had Windows Vista you could just go click the Start orb and it would be among the folders on the right side so you could just right click on it and hit 'clear list' and they would be cleared. So how can I "clear" this folder without permanently removing the original file/photo/document or whatever is in it? I don't want my dog (SUPER smart Border Collie) watching me review some photos of him or reading some training documents.

I'm a first time poster here so any help would be really welcome!




ok i'm gonna try this again.... my last novel timed out and is floating around in space somewhere now. that smiley doesn't even begin to express my emotions about that.....

You might want to Tarentino this one, my question is at the end and you could read backwards as information is needed.... I have never posted a thread but the one thing I know is that there are a lot of smart people out there who want to help, but there is never enough info. If you have some time to kill and you are looking for a bone to chew on, I would really appreciate some advice.

Preamble: I apologize because this is still going to be long winded but I'm going to try and sum it up as quickly as possible while still including all of the necessary and unecessary details. I can save some of you some typing by stating some facts right off the bat: 1- Yes. I am an idiot. 2- I definately read and purposefully do not follow instructions because to me a computer is nothing more than an expensive toy to play with. You can do what you please with yours. 3- Everything I know about computers is based off of a mixture of trial and error, and years and years of awesome threads. I know just barely enough to be dangerous.

I am actually on the asking end of a post for the first time because for once time is on my side and I am not in a panic stricken dash to save my sinking ship. I have been stretching my rope for some time now, and I think I have finally positioned myself right in the middle of a pretty snug knot.

The machine in question:

HP pavilion dv6000 (notebook)
AMD Turion 64x2 (2.00Ghz)
4GB RAM (3.75 usable)
((don't even get me started on that.... some other day. but keep that in mind cause who knows....))
150GB hard drive (~147GB) as follows:
C: Local Disk 130GB/111GB free
D: DoX (just documents and such) 998MB/103MB free
E: AMADOIR (random other storage) 7.02GB/1.08 GB free
F: HP_RECOVERY 10.7GB/1.01GB free

Ok so about a month and a half ago or so I was on a gaming tangent and decided I was going to see if I could go against the grain a little and try to squeeze some extra juice out of this notebook (obviously I was just spinning my wheels) but I did end up finding a new tangent which turned out to be way more time consuming than any game would have been anyways.

I was running the factory installed 32-bit windows VISTA with 3GB RAM, I decided that a slightly noticable performance increase would be worth a complete OS overhaul and I came across windows 7. I couldn't resist. So I swapped out the 1GB card with a 2GB card (now 2X2), burned the 64-bit image of build 7048, and set up my hard drive as it is above. My thinking at the time was that between the HP recovery partition and the backup partitions I had set up for my random odds and ends that I would be covered in a near worst case scenario. (I know better, but ***k it.)

I booted the disk and did a clean format/install on C: and despite the excitement and hype it went disappointingly smooth. No problems other then a random IE tab crash every once in a while which it actually fixes and restores the tab usually before I even noticed anything was going on. Pretty impressive for a beta. The only driver I had to putz with was a missing graphics driver which I was able to substitute with a Vista64 driver until windows recently sent me the new one. Somehow (and this is where it starts to get tricky) they even managed to package all of my program files and windows files into a nice compact 75GB folder which it must have used to string together any other missing drivers during the install. After everything was up and running smooth I shredded it and let it defrag.

Despite the fact that My Computer>Properties still claims that I have only 3.75 usable GB out of 4, I actually noticed a pretty significant increase in complete performance. Wether it was the smoother OS, the 64 bit upgrade, or the increase in memory remains to be seen, probably just a slight increase from each made a nice difference.
Fast Forward: After a month or so of extensive use the whole system was lagging and running like crap even though I was still only maxing out at 45% RAM and peaking 45-75% CPU. I attributed this to a huge variety of downloads with a crappy virus set up while I was waiting on McAfee to get around to it. Last week I found a working beta McAfee suite that set up and ran like a champ, but performance still sucked (I know McAfee is slow, what I mean is performance didn't change). Yesterday I had a couple cups of coffee in me and got to thinking that if the install and supposed "format" kept all that 75GB of windows junk through the install that it probably kept plenty of other junk as well and I decided that it wouldn't hurt to try and reformat/start over with a clean install and a nice virus suite.
This time when I got to the clean install option I clicked a box that said- format all by itself, before I clicked install and the action only took a few seconds at most. I didn't actually think it had done anything until I completed the install and found a bite size C: drive and a couple of "issues".

1- Windows can not find my internal microphone. I installed the factory drivers and it claims that there is no device to "apply" them to, so to speak. recording>properties tells me that I don't have a mic plugged in. Lots of threads on solving sound issues but havn't found near this particular issue. Least of my concerns.... just a clue.
2- I now have a missing driver for an SM Bus Controller and a Coprocessor whichwere not flagged on the previous install and have no useful information, and can not fix themselves.

Individually I could probably fix these issues but I am concerned that I have done some more damage than I planned. After the clean install, performance is sticky and piss poor even with RAM sitting still at 25% and CPU peaking under 40%.
After careful consideration I came up with the evil geneous plan which I though would solve all my problems at once. I got another cup of coffee and decided I was going to hit up the recovery partition and head back to Vista32, clean out all the garbage, and then drop a new clean 7 over that, in theory bringing me back to where I was a month ago, but wiser.

No such luck. F11 is no longer a functioning button at the BIOS screen (still listed during the momentary pause in startup, but not operational) if I hold it down the system waits for me to let go and then loads 7. The closest I have gotten is into the windows recovery center, and then into a command prompt where I was able to change to the desired directory, but I really didn't know what to do when I got there and the only folder on the F: drive was empty. Back into windows My Computer still shows 9.6GB of something on the drive but there is nothing hidden and again, one folder (RECOVERY). Empty.

I have found some good idea's but I think my best move at this point is to look for some advice.
-HP recovery disks (lame and brings about feelings of giving up...)
- This thread talks about manually writing the image over windows and kinda working backwards which I am open to, but this plan is flawed for my situation... empty folders.
-Someone mentioned installing a certain version of Linux which would add the recovery partition back into the MBR, but I know nothing about Linux and that seems like the same situation that got me into this in the first place.

My fear (worst case scenario) is that my original 64-bit w7 install did not format anything or somehow the switch from 32 to 64 was flawed in some way possibly doing damage to the processor causing a slow decay in performance. (hence the 3.75 usable RAM?)
OR
My most recent install somehow affected the recovery partition and may have wiped it clean in the process.

My question is, is there a way to bypass w7 or build my own boot image which would direct the system to boot from the recovery partition or am I fighting a losing battle?

Thank you if you are still reading this, and I would appreciate any guidance/suggestions you might have to throw out there.




Microsoft Corp. said Tuesday that regular PC users will be able to test out a "beta" version of Windows early next year. Windows 7, the forthcoming operating system, will let users choose to see fewer alerts and warnings from their computers. Rampant notifications and pop-up windows alerting people to potential security risk has irked many users of Windows Vista.

"We had all the best intentions of helping to secure the PC platform even more, particularly for novice PC users who needed to be protected," said Steven Sinofsky, a senior vice president in Microsoft's Windows group.

Sinofsky didn't back down from the major changes in Vista responsible for the rise in alerts, but he did acknowledge that Microsoft needed to work earlier and more closely with outside companies to avoid a similar mess in Windows 7.

"Despite the difficult change we introduced, we did move forward the ecosystem, making it more secure for end users," he said.

With Vista, Microsoft made some significant design changes to the way windows and icons look, and also to where certain features and functions are stashed in the system.

Windows 7 keeps some of those changes, but tosses out others. In an interview, Julie Larson-Green, a Windows vice president, offered one small example: Microsoft took the "add printer" feature out of the quick-access Start menu, but after users complained, the company is putting it back in Windows 7.

Larson-Green, who led the redesign of Office for the 2007 edition, said that some of the changes made in Vista's design made sense to designers but weren't fully tested on actual PC users.

With Windows 7, Microsoft is also making subtle but useful changes to the task bar along the bottom of the screen. The designers have taken out some redundant buttons that launch applications. And when users roll over the icon of a program in the task bar, it's easier to see how many documents or windows are open, and switch between them.

Microsoft also showed off a quick way of organizing recently used files, Web sites or often-used program features it's calling "jumplists." The company also introduced a concept called "libraries," which automatically finds similar files from a single PC, its external hard drive and even other PCs on a home network, then displays them together in a single folder. For example, that could be handy for organizing a family's digital photos, Microsoft said.

The company also appears to be betting on a rise in touch-screen PCs. Windows 7 builds in more support for gestures so that even programs that aren't designed specifically for touch-screen computers can be used to some degree by poking or swiping fingers across the screen.

Under the hood, Microsoft said it improved the speed of the system and cut the amount of memory it needs to run. Sinofsky held up a netbook — a low-cost, low-power laptop that would have a hard time running Vista — and said it's working with Windows 7.

Microsoft gave copies of a "pre-beta" version of Windows 7 to programmers attending a conference in Los Angeles, and announced the early 2009 target for the general-use beta.

The Redmond, Wash.-based software maker promised deadlines it couldn't keep when it was developing Vista, and the company is trying hard to avoid a similar debacle this time. Sinofsky said there is no date yet for the next milestone, a "release to manufacturing" version of Windows 7, and reiterated that the system is set to go on sale in early 2010.

http://tech.yahoo.com/news/ap/200810.../tec_microsoft




Dual-Boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu in Perfect Harmony

Windows 7

and Ubuntu, despite their opposing missions, can get along like best pals on a single computer. Here's how to set up a dual boot system that lets you enjoy the best of both worlds in perfect harmony.

By default, Windows 7 takes over your boot-up process and wants to be your only OS, and Linux treats Windows like a weekend hobby you keep in a shed somewhere on your hard drive. But I've been dual-booting Ubuntu and some version of Windows 7 for nearly a year, and I've learned a lot about inconveniences, annoyances, and file-sharing necessities, and now I'll walk you through how to set up your systems to achieve a peaceful union of your dual-boot OSes. (Both with Windows 7 already installed, and with a clean system ready for a new dual-OS existence.)
Follow through this guide, and I'll explain how to rebuild a system from the ground up with Windows 7 and Ubuntu, with either a backed-up and cleaned-out hard drive (recommended) or Windows 7 already installed. When we're done, you can work and play in either operating system, quickly and conveniently access your documents, music, pictures, and other files without worry or inconvenience, and boot into either system without having to worry about whether Windows is going to get mad at you. Plus, when Ubuntu 10.04 or Windows 8 come along, you'll find it much easier to install either one without having to start over entirely from scratch.

What you'll need

Windows 7 installation disc: For clean installations, either a full installation copy or an upgrade disc is needed. If you own an upgrade disc but want to start from scratch, there's a way to do a clean install with an upgrade disc, though that's a rather gray-area route. Then again, there's probably not a person on this earth that doesn't have a licensed copy of XP or Vista somewhere in their past.Ubuntu 9.10 installation image: You can grab an ISO at Ubuntu.com, or hit "Alternative download options" to reveal a (usually very fast) BitTorrent link. You'll want to get the ubuntu-9.10-desktop-i386.iso download for 32-bit systems, or ubuntu-9.10-desktop-amd64.iso.torrent for 64-bit on AMD or Intel systems (despite the name).Blank CD or empty USB drive: You'll need one of these for burning the Ubuntu ISO, or loading it for USB boot. If you're going the thumb drive route, grab UNetBootin for Windows or Linux, plug in your USB drive, and load it with the downloaded ISO image.All your data backed up: Even if you're pulling this off with Windows 7 already installed and your media and documents present, you'll want to have a fallback in case things go awry. Which they shouldn't, but, naturally, you never know.Free time: I'd reckon it takes about 2 hours to pull off two OS installs on a clean system; more if you've got a lot of data to move around.

Setting up your hard drive

If you've got nothing installed on your system, or you've got your data backed up and you're ready to start from scratch, you're in a great position--skip down to the "Partition your system" section. If you've got Windows already installed, you can still make a spot for Ubuntu, though.

(Only) If Windows is already installed: You're going to "shrink" the partition that Windows 7 installed itself on. Before we do that, clean out any really unnecessary applications and data from your system (we like Revo Uninstaller for doing this). Also, open up "Computer" and take note of how much space remains on your main hard drive, presumably labeled "C:". Head to the Start menu, type "disk management" into the search box, and hit Enter.

Windows 7 probably put two partitions on your hard drive: one, about 100 MB in size, holding system restoration data. We don't want to touch it. Right-click on the bigger partition to the right, and choose Shrink Partition.

After a little bit of hard drive activity and a "Please wait" window, you'll get back the size you can shrink your Windows partition by.

If the space Windows offers doesn't jibe with what your Computer view told you was "remaining," you might need to hit Cancel, then head back and defragment your hard drive, and take some of the steps laid out by the How-To Geek. Run the Disk Management tool again and try a Shrink Volume operation again, and free up as much space as you can.

Partition your system: You're aiming to set up a system with three partitions, or sections, to its hard drive: One lean partition for the Windows operating system and applications running from it, another just-big-enough partition for Ubuntu and its own applications, and then a much larger data partition that houses all the data you'll want access to from either one. Documents, music, pictures, application profiles—it all goes in another section I'll call "Storage" for this tutorial.

How do you get there? We're going to use GParted, the Linux-based uber-tool for all things hard drive. You could grab the Live CD if you felt like it, but since you've already downloaded an Ubuntu installer, you can simply boot a "live," no-risk session of Ubuntu from your CD or USB stick and run GParted from there. Once you're inside Ubuntu, head to the System menu in the upper left when you get to a desktop, then choose the Administration menu and GParted under it.

You'll see your system's hard drive and its partitions laid out. You're going to create partitions for Linux and your storage space, but not Windows—we'll let the Windows installation carve out its own recovery partition and operating space. On my own system, I give Windows 15 GB of unallocated space, and Ubuntu another 15 GB of space right after it, with whatever's left kept as storage space. Then again, I've only got a 100 GB hard drive and don't run huge games or applications, so you can probably give your two operating systems a bit more space to grow.
Click on the unallocated space and hit the "New" button at the far left. In the "Free space preceding" section, click and hold the up button, or enter a number of megabytes, to leave space for Windows at the front. When you've got the "space preceding" set, set the actual size of the Ubuntu partition in the "New Size" section, and leave "Free space following" alone. Choose "unformatted" under file system—we'll let Ubuntu do the format itself and hit "Add." Back at the main GParted window, click on the space to the right of your two OS spaces, hit "New" again, and set the file system as "ntfs." Give it a label like "Storage," hit "Add," and at the main GParted window, hit the checkmark button to apply your changes. Once it's done, exit out of GParted and shut down the system from the pull-down menu in the upper-right corner.

If Windows is already installed: If you've shrunk down its partition for free space and booted into a live Ubuntu or GParted, click on the "Unallocated" piece next to the two "ntfs" partitions that represent your Windows 7 installation and system recovery tools. Create a 15(-ish) GB unformatted partition, and give it a label like Ubuntu. If you've got a good deal of space left, format it as "ntfs" and label it something like "Storage." If you can just barely fit the Ubuntu partition, you can just keep your media files in the Windows partition—until you can remedy this with a full wipe-and-install down the line.

Experienced Linux geeks might be wondering where the swap space is going—but don't worry, we'll create one, just not in its own partition.

Installing and configuring Windows

Grab your Windows 7 installation disc—either a full copy or modified upgrade disc, and insert it into your DVD drive. If your system isn't set up to boot from CD or DVD drive, look for the button to press at start-up for "Boot options" or something similar, or hit up your system maker's help guides to learn how to change your boot order in the BIOS settings.
Follow through the Windows 7 installation, being sure to choose "Custom" for the installation method and to point it at that unallocated space we created at the beginning of your hard disk, not the NTFS-formatted media/storage space we made earlier:

Work your way through the Windows 7 installation, all the way until you reach the Windows desktop. Feel free to set up whatever programs or apps you want, but what we really want to do is set up your Storage partition to house your pictures, music, video, and other files, and make your Libraries point to them.
Hit the Start menu, click Computer, and double-click on the hard drive named "Storage" (assuming you named it that earlier). In there, right-click and create new folders (or hit Ctrl+Shift+N) for the files you'll be using with both systems. I usually create folders labeled Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos—I could also see folders for saved games and data files from big software packages. Copy your media files into these folders now, if you'd like, but we've got a bit more tweaking to pull off.
In the left-hand sidebar, you'll see your "Libraries" for documents, music, pictures, and video. At the moment, they point to your Public shared folders and the My Pictures-type folders on your main Windows drive. Click once on any of the Libraries, and at the top of the main panel, you'll see text stating that this library "Includes: 2 locations ...". Click the blue text on "2 locations," then click on each of the folders below and hit "Remove" on the right-hand side. Now hit "Add" and select the corresponding folder on your Storage drive. Do the same for all your music, pictures, videos, and other media folders.

Want to add another library for quick access? Right-click somewhere on the desktop, choose New->Library, and follow the steps.
That's about it for Windows. Now get your Ubuntu CD or USB stick ready and insert it in your system. Ignore whatever auto-play prompts appear, and restart your system.

Installing and configuring Ubuntu

Restart your computer, this time booting from your Ubuntu Live CD or USB boot drive. When your system boots up, choose your language, select "Try Ubuntu without any changes to your computer," and you'll boot into a "live" desktop, run entirely off the CD or USB stick. Once you're booted up, try connecting to the internet from the network icon in the upper-right—it helps during the installation process, ensures your network is working, and gives you something to do (Firefox) while the system installs.
Click the "Install" link on the desktop, and fill out the necessary language/location/keyboard info (most U.S. users can skip through the first 3 screens). When you hit the "Prepare disk space" section, select the "Specify partitions manually" option, then hit Forward. Select the free space that's after your first two Windows partitions with ntfs formats, then hit the "Add" button at bottom. Your partition should already be sized correctly, and the only thing to change is set "/" as a mount point. Here's what your screen should look like:

Click OK, then finish through with the Ubuntu installation. If it catches your Windows 7 installation, it might ask if you want to import settings from inside it—you can, if you'd like, but I usually skip this. Wait for the installation to finish, remove the CD or thumb drive, and reboot your system.

When you start up again, you'll see a list of OS options. The only ones you need concern yourself with are Windows 7 and the top-most Ubuntu line. You can prettify and fix up this screen, change its settings, and modify its order later on. For now, let's head into Ubuntu.

We're going to make the same kind of folder access change we did in Windows. Click up on the "Places" menu, choose "Home Folder," and check out the left-hand sidebar. It's full of links to Documents, Pictures, and the like, but they all point to locations inside your home folder, on the Linux drive that Windows can't read. Click once on any of those folders, then right-click and hit Remove.

You should see your "Storage" partition in the left-hand sidebar, but without that name—more like "100GB filesystem." Double-click it, type in the administrator password you gave when installing, and you'll see your Documents, Music, etc. Click and drag those folders into the space where the other folders were, and now you'll have access to them from the "Places" menu, as well as any file explorer window you have open.
Ubuntu won't "mount," or make available, your Windows 7 and Storage drives on boot-up, however, and we at least want constant access to the Storage drive. To fix that, head to Software Sources in the System->Administration menu. From there go to Applications, then the Ubuntu Software Center at the bottom. Under the "Ubuntu Software" and "Updates" sections, add a check to the un-checked sources, like Restricted, Multiverse, Proposed, and Backports. Hit "Close," and agree to Reload your software sources.

Finally! Head to the Applications menu and pick the Ubuntu Software Center. In there, search for "ntfs-config," and double-click on the NTFS Configuration Tool that's the first result. Install it, then close the Software Center. If you've got the "Storage" or Windows 7 partitions mounted, head to any location in Places and then click the eject icon next to those drives in the left-hand sidebar. Now head to the System->Administration menu and pick the NTFS Configuration Tool.

You'll see a few partitions listed, likely as /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, and the like. If you only want your storage drive, it should be listed as /dev/sda3 or something similar--just not the first or second options. Check the box for "Add," click in the "Mount point" column to give it a name (Storage, perhaps?), and hit "Apply." Check both boxes on the next window to allow read/write access, and hit OK, and you're done. Now the drive with all your stuff is accessible to Windows and Linux at all times.

Adding swap to Ubuntu

"Swap" memory is a section of the hard drive that your system's memory spills over into when it gets full and busy. Until recently, I'd been creating a whole separate partition for it. Recently, though, I've found that swap isn't always necessary on systems with a large amount of memory, and that swap can simply be a file tucked away on your hard drive somewhere.

Follow the Ubuntu help wiki's instructions for adding more swap, but consider changing the location they suggest putting the swap file—/mnt/swap/ for the place your Storage is held—/media/Storage, in my case.

Share Firefox profiles and more

That's about it for this guide to setting up a harmonious Windows and Ubuntu existence, but I recommend you also check out our previous guide to using a single data store when dual-booting. It explains the nitty-gritty of sharing Firefox, Thunderbird, and Pidgin profiles between Linux and Windows for a consistent experience, as well as a few other dual-boot tricks.

You might also want to consider creating virtual machines with VirtualBox for those moments when you're in one OS and need to get at the other. Ubuntu is free to create as many instances as you want, of course, and Windows 7 (Professional and Ultimate) are very friendly with non-activated copies—not that either can't be otherwise activated in cases where it's just a double-use issue.





Windows 7 Forums recommends Auslogics BoostSpeed to repair Windows errors. Get it now.
May 1st, 2012: 25% off. Use coupon code: WINDOWS7FORUMS

Optimize every aspect of Windows 7 with the System Advisor or manually.Repair corrupt registry entries and defragment the registry.Disable and enable services based on how you are using your computer.Adjust and edit hundreds of settings to fix your computer in a few easy clicks.Includes File Recovery (undelete) free of charge.

Other Auslogics software:

Auslogics Antivirus
Auslogics File Recovery
Auslogics Disk Defrag Pro

Auslogics BoostSpeed 5 is quite possibly the best overall system maintenance tool of the year. Having received 5 stars from CNET, they also receive a 10/10 full endorsement from Windows7Forums.com. BoostSpeed isn't just about making your computer fast: It's about making preventative maintenance manageable through one application. While the market calls for a typical system scan to attract buyers, that scan is entirely legitimate, and does correct serious registry problems in a way that far exceeds industry expectations. CCleaner, for example, can hardly hold a candle to this utility.

Looking closer at the System Advisor, we can determine whether or not the Internet connection can be automatically optimized. This is done with BoostSpeed through a manual or automatic setting in the Auslogics Internet Optimizer. Auslogics Registry Defrag will let you know that you can reduce registry access time and increase overall system performance by running this tool. This is a very delicate task that most freeware applications will not take on. Defragmenting the registry involves significant risk if there is a failure and that is why Auslogics BoostSpeed 5 comes with a Rescue Center, which can literally allow you to backup the changes that have been made within the program. The program will even automatically create these restore points before adjusting your system for perfect fine tuning.

If the Disk and Registry Maintenance options weren't enough, Auslogics BoostSpeed 5 comes with in-depth ways to determine and modify your System Status and Privacy. If that weren't enough, the System Tweaks area allows you to optimize your Windows services around how you use your computer. This can be so useful in a work environment, as most system services continue running unabated, even when they will never be used!

Control over startup items and installed software has never been easier. Needless duplicate files found on a system can be deleted and disks can be explored to discover what is eating up all of that storage space. The System tweaks area is where Auslogics BoostSpeed really shines. It contains management options for the User Interface, Start Menu, Taskbar, Windows Explorer, System Security, Startup and Shutdown, System, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, and numerous additional Software Tweaks.

"Hi, I’m Jessica Dolcourt from CNET Download and this is a first look at Auslogics BoostSpeed. This is a top rated program that attempts to defrag, tweak, and otherwise optimize the computer where its most likely to get bogged down. Looking at the clean launch interface, you might never guess that there are 18 tools bundled into one app. The main pane is dominated by shortcuts for testing the health of the system. One Button Checkup will scan for issues and attempt to fix them. For instance, Disk Cleaner’s job is to find and remove junk files. With most scans you run, you’ll have the opportunity to take a closer look at the files, and to back them up before you change anything. Since the goal of the program is to optimize performance, BoostSpeed often frames problems in terms of how much space you would free if you deleted the loose files. On the left, the system tools are organized by activity: Computer, Cleanup, Optimization, Privacy, Settings, and so on. When you click the task category, you’ll see the available tools and a brief description of what they do. Clicking the tools launches it in a separate window, so that you can return to this main interface at any time. Most tools are easy to work their way around, and most changes can be undone in Auslogics Rescue Center, which you can get to from individual tool interfaces or from the settings on the BoostSpeed panel interface. In the Rescue Center, you’ll see a list of the changes you’ve made. You’ll be able to see full details for each entry and view archive backups as well. Which system files BoostSpeed will back up, and which it will leave alone, are things you can specify in the program settings, under the tab that says Rescue Center. We’re fans of Auslogics BoostSpeed for its comprehensive system maintenance and nicely packaged interface. Some of the app’s component parts are offered as stand-alone freeware products, such as the Disk Defrag…" - Courtesy CNET Review of Auslogics BoostSpeed

Under User Interface:
Disable AeroMake menu bars and window frames opaque instead of translucentDo not animate windows when minimizing and maximizingSlow the window animations when holding Shift keyDisable 3D Window SwitchingAdd context menu to activate Flip 3DTurn off Aero PeekTurn off Aero SnapTurn off Aero Shake
Under Visual Effects:
Hide window contents while draggingDo not drop shadows under icons on the desktopDo not use translucent selection rectangleShow Windows version in the desktop bottom right cornerSelect how you want the arrows displayed on shortcuts
Under Animation:
Do not allow window animationDo not use smooth scrolling for list boxesDo not animate drop-down listsSelect tooltip animation types
Menu:
Do not use menu fading animation effectsHide shadows under menusHide underlined letters for keybaord navigation until ALT is pressedMenu animation effects optionsDelay before displaying submenus (in milliseconds!)Full font smoothing optionsExtended ClearType and Standard font smoothing options
Start Menu:
Hide "Log Off" from the Start MenuHide the "Run itemHide "Set Program Access And Defaults" ("Default Programs" in Vista)Hide the "Help and Support" itemHide the "All Programs" menuHide "Administrative Tools"Hide the list of frequently used programsHide the list of pinned programsHide the "See more results" link
Under Folder options determine whether to hide individual items, show them as a link, or show them as a menu easily

Effects:
Do not highlight recently installed programsDo not show partially installed programs in grayDo not sort the "All Programs" menu by nameDisable the context menu and drag itemsDisable the "Start" button tooltipExpand menu when you hover the mouse pointer over an itemEnable small icons in the Start menu
Taskbar:
Show notification areaDo not display tooltips in the notification areaDo not hide unused icons in the notification areaDo not display the network activity icon in the notification areaDo not display the sound settings icon in the notification areaDo not display the battery icon in the notifications areaAuto-hide taskbarDo not slide taskbar buttonsAllow moving or rearranging taskbar itemsGroup similar buttons: Do not group, Group when full, Always group and hide tagsButtons: Configure advanced settings for taskbar application buttons
Explorer:
Show hidden filesShow file extensionsuse Windows classic foldersDisplay checkboxes to help select multiple filesAlways show the menu bar in Windows ExplorerDisable file and folder pop-up descriptionsDisplay folder size in the folder tooltip
Thumbnails:
Disable thumbnail cache creationDo not display thumbnails in network foldersThumbnail quality - 0-100%Thumbnail size in pixelsShow address bar folder path autocompleteShow address bar folder path autosuggestShow address bar maximized as a drop-down listInclude variable "PATH" into search pathDisable automatic replacement of a blackslash to a forward slash
Context Menu:
Show "Open Command Prompt"Show "Send To"Show "Copy to Folder..."Show "Move to Folder..."Show "Run as administrator"Show "Take ownership"Show "Search..."
Options:
Restore open Explorer windows when you restartDisable CD burning functions in Windows ExplorerRun Desktop and Explorer tasks as seperate processesRun each Explorer window as a seperate processAutomatically restart the shell if a shell error occursDisable the option to search the Internet when you open a file with unknown extension
Explorer items:
Display encrypted and compressed files and folders in a different colorDrive letter is displayed after disk labelDrive letter is displayed before disk labelDrive letter is displayed before disk label for network driveDrive letter is not displayed!
Autoplay:

Disable autorun for:
Removable drives (Floppy, flash-drive, etc)Non-removable drives (hard disk, etc)Optical disk drives (CD, DVD, etc)Temporary memory disk (RAM-disk)Network drivesUnknown drive types
Command Prompt:
Enable advanced modeEnable delayed expansion of environmental variablesEnable quick editingFile names autocomplete hotkeyFolder names autocomplete hotkey
System Security:
Disable User Acount ControlSet all UAC options including advanced options only found in registry
Privacy Policy:
Wipe page file on computer shutdownClear the "Recent documents" list on logoffDo not create the "Recent Documents" listDo not store your logon password on the diskDisable hidden sharesDisable user trackingEnable encrypt/decrypt options in ExplorerDisable Faster User Switching
For anonymous users:
Access is allowed with the default settingsTransfer of accounts and SAM names is prohibitedAccess is denied if permits are not specified
Windows Defender:
Disable Windows DefenderDisable heuristic scanningDisable archive scansDisable removable media scansDisable e-mail scansDisable real-time protectionDisable real-time protection promptsDisable downloads checkupDisable executable files checkupDisable definition updates through alternate download locationsCheck for new signatures before scheduled scansDo not log unknown detectionsDo not log known good detections
Startup and Shutdown:
Disable Windows startup soundDisable parsing AUTOEXEC.BATDisplay information about previous logons during user logonDisable Ctrl-Alt-Del before logonRun logon scripts simultaneouslyOptimize system files placement on the diskSpecify time to wait before running Check Disk (chkdsK) in seconds
Event Logging:
Do not log any eventsLog standard events onlyLog all startup and shutdown events
Legal Notice:
Write any legal notice you want during startup of Microsoft Windows
Automatic login:
Use autologin and set credentials, including username, password, and domain
System:

OEM Info:

Configure Windows OEM attributes, such as the manufacturer's logo and support information that appears in the System Properties window.

This includes:
ManufacturerModelSupport URLWorking HoursPhone120x120 pixel logo
Application Start:
Disable "Program Compatibility Assistant"Disable "Program Compatibility Wizard"Disable running 16-bit applicationsRun 16-bit programs as a separate processAdd checkbox "Run in seperate memory space" for 16-bit applications
Error Handling:
Disable sound when errors occurAutomatic restart in case of a critical errorSend error reportsShow error notification in windowDon't save reports on your computerDon't send additional information in a reportDon't write error information into system log
If an error occurs:
Ask user consent to send a reportAutomatically include only basic information in the reportAutomatically include all but personal data in the reportAutomatically include all data in the report
Internet Explorer:

Interface:
Disable visual-styled controls in Internet Explorer pagesDisable page transitionsDisable Clear Type fontsDisable smooth scrollingDisable autoamtic updatesAlways show menusDo not show extended error messagesDo not show the welcome text for new opened tabsDo not show warning messages when closing tabsDo not send bug reports via the InternetAlways ask before downloading filesPlace the menu above the address bar
Behavior:
Let Internet Explorer decide how pop-ups should openAlways open pop-ups in a new windowAlways open pop-ups in a new tab
Specify how Internet Explorer displays a web page when it's launched from another program:
Opens in a new windowOpens in a new tab in the current windowOpens in the current tab or window
Connections
Speed up web browsing in IE by using more concurrent Internet connectionsIncludes anywhere from 1-20 connections (Default is 4)
Options:
Default file download directoryHome PageCaption string that is displayed after the page title
Microsoft Office:
Do not track document editing timeBlock updates from the Office Update SiteDisable Customer Experience Improvement programDisable error reportingDisable logging Microsoft Office activityDisable Office DiagnosticsDisable clipboard dialog boxPrevent Office Help from resizing the application window
Microsoft Word:
Do not check spelling as you typeDo not check grammar as you typeDo not use background printingDo not auto-save background printingDo not auto-save documents in the backgroundDo not use translucent selectionDo not check if MS Word is the default HTML editor
Microsoft Excel:
Show Formula bar in Full ViewCache spreadsheetsCache PivotTable reportsUndo steps: Set from 0 to 100
Software tweaks (The ones we can see so far)

Skype:
Disable file transferDisable loading language filesDisable publishing Skype status on the WebDisable Skype Public APIDisable checking for updatesDisable listening for TCP connectionsDisable UDP communications
Windows Media Player
Disable auto-updatesDisable automatic codec downloadsDisable Windows Media Digital Rights Management (DRM)Disable video smoothingDisable CD and DVD Media information retrievalDisable music file media information retrievalDisable media file sharingDisable script handling in media filesHide the "Privacy" tab in the settingsHide the "Security" tab in the settingsHide the "Network" tab in the settings
Adobe Reader:
Disable splash screenDisplay PDF in the browser windowDisable Purchase Acrobat item in the menu
Firefox:
Disable link prefetchingDo not reduce memory when minimizedDo not download favorite icons (favicons)Disable blinking elementsForce frames to be reesizableUse old style for opening tabsShow all images / Block all images / Load images from the requird site only and block images from othersClose Tab Button full range of optionsHow long Firefox waits for the web page data before it displays the page (From 0 to 1 sec)
System Information includes everything:
OverviewGeneralHardwareCPUMotherbaordMemory ModulesVideoStorageIO DevicesInput DevicesModemsNetwork AdaptersResourcesProblem DevicesOperating SystemProgramsNetworkApplication ErrorsDevice ManagerMemory UsagePerformance
Tasks show Applications, processes, services, and locked files. You can unlock locked files, change the status of services, end processes, and modify application data.

Auslogics Disk Explorer will show what folders are taking up the most space and allow you to delete empty folders on your system.

File Recovery allows you to undelete files.

Speed Up Internet includes:
Automatic tuningAuto HeuristicsDefault TTLGlobal Max TCP WindowMax MTUTCP Window SizeMax Connections Per 1_0 ServerMax Simultaneous HTTP ConnectionsFirefox Max ConnectionsFirefix Max Connections Per Server
TCP/IP
1323 OptsACK FrequencyARP Cache LifeARP Cache Min Reference LifeARP Cache SizeAuto HeuristicsAuto TuningCongestion ControlDefault TTLDel ACK TicksDisable Task OffloadECN CapabilityEnable PMTU BH DetectEnable PMTU DiscoveryFin Wait DelayGlobal Max TCP Window SizeInitial RTTIPv6 over IPv4Keep Alive InternalKeep Alive TimeMax Connect RetriesMax Data RetransmissionsMax Dup ACKsMax MTUNum ConnectionsReceive-side ScalingSACK EnabledTCP Window SizeSYN Attack ProtectTimed Wait DelayUse RFC1122 Urgent Pointer
Winsock:
Default Receive WindowDefault Send WindowLarge Buffer SizeMedium Buffer SizeNon Blocking Send Special bufferingSmall Buffer SizeTransmit Worker
Workstation:
Request Buffer SizeUse Raw ReadUse Raw WriteUse Write Raw Data
Dns Cache:
Adapter Timeout TimeHash Table Bucket SizeHash Table SizeMax Entry TTL LimitMax SOA Entry TTL LimitNegative SOA TimeNegative TimeNet Failure Time
Internet Explorer:
DNS Cache EnabledDNS Cache TimeoutKeepAlive TimeoutMax Connections Per 1_0 ServerMax Connections Per ServerReceive TimeoutServer Info TimeoutSocket Receive Buffer LengthSocket Send Buffer LengthTCP Autotuning
Firefox:
Disable IPv6DNS Cache EntriesDNS Cache ExpirationHTTP Connect TimeoutKeepAlive TimeoutMax ConnectionsMax Connections Per ServerMax Persistent Connections Per ServerMax Persistent Connections Per ProxyPipeliningPipelining Max RequestsPrefetch NextProxy PipeliningUse KeepAliveUsing Proxy KeepAlive
(Auto-optimization is based on Over 1Mbps / 1Mbps or lower (default that Windows assumes) / or 128kbps or lower)

The built-in System Advisor determines (THESE ARE JUST SOME):
Can the Internet connection be optimized?Is the registry fragmented?Can Windows shutdown be sped up?Can incorrect drivers be updated? (It updates them in Auslogics Device Manager)
Quick Tasks allow you to:
Erase browser historyErase Windows historyCleanupt emporary filesOptimize memory
Privacy allows you to shred files and wippe entire disks.

Let's check that one again:
Disk MaintenanceFree Up SpaceRemove DuplicatesExplore diskDisk cleanupDisk defragmentDisk repairSoftware ControlSystem TweaksService OptimizationDisaster RecoveryFile RecoveryRescue CenterRegistry MaintenanceRegistry RepairRegistry DefragmentSystem StatusSystem InformationSystem TasksSystem ServicesLocked FilesComputer PrivacyErase Computer HistoryShred FilesWipe disksSpeed Up InternetInternet OptimizationMemory Optimization
It is quite probable that Auslogics BoostSpeed is the best program on the market for system repair and optimization EVER. Even if you don't know how to use the options listed above, that is why this program is great. It really DOES it for you. It really does repair your registry, with money behind it that went into big time research and development.

Their previous freeware products have been used regularly by IT professionals, but this product includes absolutely everything. There is nothing missing in this program, and updates are absolutely frequent. It is the one application I would recommend to every member of Windows7Forums.com without hesitation. Even if you do not know what these settings mean, this program will optimize and repair your system without any doubt. Today, there are so many programs that "claim" to do this and do that. When we saw Auslogics offering a commercial solution I had to start offering it on my website after I saw what it could do. I had to make a video about it. I had to find a way to provide a discount to members.

I have recommended it to my mother, my grandparents, and I will bring it up to a client I am currently working with tomorrow who is asking for Windows XP. This is the program that you need to automatically manage your system and keep it up-to-date, speedy, and performing in top condition.

Windows 7 Forums Rating: 10/10 Stars

Don't take my word for it. CNET gave them 5/5 stars too!

Watch our YouTube video for an exclusive discount offer.




You can place .pst files wherever you want. The default location is

Cocuments and SettingsLocal SettingsApplication DataMicrosoftOutlook

(this is for Windows XP, I assume it will be similar for Windows Vista), but you're free to store them elsewhere. The Local Settings and Application Data folders are hidden, so you'll only see them if you display hidden files and folders in Windows Explorer.

I wonder if the files you mention have been used recently - my .pst files change date each time I use them.

In recent versions of Outlook, the Contacts folder is used as address book; the Contacts folder is stored in the .pst file, not as a separate file.




I am/have tried to create a new user account, specifically to take the place of a suspected corrupt user account (per MS Moderator posts re Excel not responding repeatedly when copying). I have looked around the web, MS support sites, and read posts all over a couple of forums and am trying to get things straight.

Below I describe the nature of my need, but first can you confirm the following?:

A) a person should have at least two UA's on their computer, one standard, to be used regularly, and an admin for admin purposes

B) in order to create a new UA and copy any part of the old UA to the new one, one must create a third UA, as an admin, so you can use it to accomplish working with both accounts

Problem-Start
MS has a web page entitled "Fix a corrupted user profile" at Fix a corrupted user profile
While the document pertained to Vista, recent posts from users with W7 have received responses from MS moderators with instructions to access this webpage to fix a corrupted UA. Also within W7's help, these same instructions come up. When I followed the instructions, a number of issues came up and recently a MS Moderator told me not to do the following from the instructions, despite previous posts to the contrary.

In essence, MS instructs you to copy the contents of C:/Users/CorruptAcct to C:/Users/NewAcct, but to exclude all ntuser files from the copy.

Questions to Resolve Problem and Finally Get Some Clarity!!
1) I can't know what part of the CorruptAcct is corrupt, so why would I copy anything over?

2) When you do follow the copying instructions, not everything copies over, e.g. AppData. From my searches, this is to be expected. What other parts of the CorruptAcct or just an OldAcct users' file should be expected to not copy over? And why?

3) What does this (starting with a brand new or incompletely copied over UA) mean in terms of what will change about your computer and what you will have to do to "rebuild" the computer the way you had it or on your other account? What kinds of things will you have to re-download?

4) So isn't there, shouldn't there be a way to share desktop, start menu, taskbar, and other applications between users if keeping both UAs (not deleting a corrupt UA). How do you do this? I know there is a shared users folder, but am unsure re copying, from where, junctions, if they are even related to the Doc&Settings/Users--Shared connection, and how to identify individual files to share, such as a setting or icon file.

5) What is the difference between a user account and a user profile? And is any difference related to creating new accounts just so have another or to replace a corrupt account? Maybe related to copying apps, settings?

With answers to these questions, I will be able to finish the task of no longer maintaining only one account on my computer, having this account be an admin account, create a new account, designated as standard, to be used everyday, and have an admin account, also newly created

I pretty much have the know-how to do whatever needs to be done, but I need to know if any part of corrupted can be copied, and if so, how -- and -- how share rebuilt (assuming will have to) desktop, prior computer configurations, etc. between the two new users I will have.

I really want to settle this issue! After looking for so long for clarity, I want to know what I'm asking simply because now I both have to know! and I need some help to put this to rest!

Any input would be greatly, greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Avery

Sorry, haven't posted specs: HP Pavilion, W7 Home Premium, x64




Hi

I'm really confused about what I should do. I recently wiped my HDD after getting a new box, installed XP then W7RC. When installing XP, I made 2 Partitions, C:/ and D:/. The C:/ drive was ~100 GB on which I installed the OS, and the D:/ Drive was ~130 GB. What I then did was copy the contents of the user folder (My Documents, My Music, My Pictures, My Videos, etc.) onto the D:/ Drive. I set the Libraries to display the Documents, Music, Pictures and Video folders on the D:/ Drive and removed the Users and Public Folders from the Libraries.

Confusing bit.

Should I move the location of the Folders on the C:/ drive to the D:/. What will this do? Will this remove the contents of the Folders on the D:/ Drive? Will it change the icons for all the folders on the D:/ to the ones in the user folder on the C:/.

Also, I read that in Vista, there is a Redirect Option. What does this do and what are the benefits of doing this? Can this be simulated by moving the folders to the D:/ Drive then in the C:/ Drive make a shortcut to the ones in the D:/Drive?

Thanks in advance to any useful help.

Haelbarde

EDIT:

I know how to change the location. Does this remove the Folder from the Users folder on C:/ and put it on D:/ and will everything then automatically go to D:/ Drive instead?

Thanks again




So I've recently noticed a problem with my Windows 7 x64 PC where whenever I rebooted, when it came back to the welcome screen it was staying there saying "Please wait," for a few minutes (not sure what it was doing, but it was doing it in safe mode too...) So I wanted to check my eventlog to see what the error was... because I was sure it was something that was probably looping over and over causing the please wait message.

When I went into Eventvwr I got this error message when it began loading-

"Event Log service is unavailable. Verify that the service is running"

So, seeing that I immediately just thought to go in and enable my eventlog service, when I went in to services.msc to see what happened, I saw that it was "Starting..." and it was sitting there not moving at all.

After seeing that, I checked its' dependencies and there are NONE! Though Task Scheduler, and Windows Event Collector both rely on this service to actually function. So because the Eventlog is not actually starting, I can't get my Task scheduler or my Windows Event Collector services to start.

Event Collector
(This one was a bit strange, because I don't have an HTTP Service that it's relying on to be able to start... but I don't recall ever even having an HTTP Service to begin with.)

Event Collector

________________________________________________________________________

So I'm without a clue what to do next!
I've tried practically everything suggested from random people on Google (which is sometimes a bad idea, but I guess it's my normal way to approach things like this.)

I'd LOVE to fix this problem (The problems opening the said services,) and I'd LOVE to fix the other problem that I first saw with the "Please wait" at the Welcome screen... because it never did that before.

Below are the solutions that I've attempted. Nothing has cured this damn service problem, tell me what you think I should honestly try (and please don't say formatting. I can't afford that time lost... I mean, if I can't fix this, I'll have to but I'd really like to try any other possible method.

________________________________________________________________________

Windows 7, I can 'Repair My System' ::I was excited that this could be my 'easy fix solution, and unfortunately it didn't really even help me. It said it couldn't find a problem with my PC when I tried repairing. I accessed the system based restore option (f8 before windows loaded.) When I tried loading from the CD to try to repair from that, it couldn't detect my Windows Installation to get into the repair screen, and it kept asking me to load the drivers for the sata drive... but I was able to actually browse my loaded windows directories to get the drive but couldn't find it. *Sigh
________________________________________________________________________
SFC /Scannow ::
Beginning verification phase of system scan. Verification 100% complete. Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.
________________________________________________________________________
Rename These Folders (Auto-Creation At Boot) ::
Saw that if I renamed the folders/files below, it'll recreate them at boot with the correct properties etc- ... this didn't do anything.
%Windir%/Logs
%Windir/System32/Logfiles
%Windir/System32/Logfiles
%Windir/System32/Tasks
________________________________________________________________________

System Restore? Why not::
Oh this was gorgeous when I tried this in safe mode. It pretty much just stayed at "Initializing Restore" for about an hour and a half before I was tired of waiting and just manually restarted my PC... This happened with every different restore date that it had available (which were only about 12 dates.) I didn't wait the entire hour and a half for the other dates, but after about 30-40 minutes I was tired of waiting... it shouldn't EVER take that long.
________________________________________________________________________

Permissions For Registry Items ::
Making sure the registry items below have proper permissions set for local service, administrators, system, and my username.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetserviceseventlog
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetservicesEventSystem
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetservicesSchedule
________________________________________________________________________

Resetting The WMI Repository ::
Stopped the WMI Service, and went to the windowssystem32WBEM and renamed the Repository folder... Rebooted and it didn't really change my error.
________________________________________________________________________

Subinacl Reset Permissions ::
Tried using subinacl to restore all orginal registry and Windows file/folder permissions... this didn't do anything but...
subinacl /subkeyreg HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE /grant=administrators=f /grant=system=f
subinacl /subkeyreg HKEY_CURRENT_USER /grant=administrators=f /grant=system=f
subinacl /subkeyreg HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT /grant=administrators=f /grant=system=f
subinacl /subdirectories %SystemDrive% /grant=administrators=f /grant=system=f
subinacl /subdirectories %windir%*.* /grant=administrators=f /grant=system=f
secedit /configure /cfg %windir%infdefltbase.inf /db defltbase.sdb /verbose ________________________________________________________________________

A user called 'EventLog' ::
Strangely enough, another post from some random forum on google suggested this...

Access was denied on c:windowssystem32winevtlogs and on c:windowsserviceprofileslocalserviceappdatalocal

Tried to set permissions from a working Vista PC, but could not find a user called 'EventLog' (which has full control on the winevtlogs directory on the working pc). So I added 'everyone' with full control rights to the winevtlogs dir and the service was starting fine. ________________________________________________________________________

Winsock resetting? A lot said it worked! ::
Netsh winsock reset, reboot, nothing at all. It seemed speed up my restart quite a bit but I was still unable to start the said services and STILL was my welcome screen on reboot taking a GOD awful long time.

________________________________________________________________________




You might want to Tarentino this one, my question is at the end and you could read backwards as information is needed.... I have never posted a thread but the one thing I know is that there are a lot of smart people out there who want to help, but there is never enough info. If you have some time to kill and you are looking for a bone to chew on, I would really appreciate some advice.

Preamble: I apologize because this is still going to be long winded but I'm going to try and sum it up as quickly as possible while still including all of the necessary and unecessary details. I can save some of you some typing by stating some facts right off the bat: 1- Yes. I am an idiot. 2- I definately read and purposefully do not follow instructions because to me a computer is nothing more than an expensive toy to play with. You can do what you please with yours. 3- Everything I know about computers is based off of a mixture of trial and error, and years and years of awesome threads. I know just barely enough to be dangerous.

I am actually on the asking end of a post for the first time because for once time is on my side and I am not in a panic stricken dash to save my sinking ship. I have been stretching my rope for some time now, and I think I have finally positioned myself right in the middle of a pretty snug knot.

The machine in question:

HP pavilion dv6000 (notebook)
AMD Turion 64x2 (2.00Ghz)
4GB RAM (3.75 usable)
((don't even get me started on that.... some other day. but keep that in mind cause who knows....))
150GB hard drive (~147GB) as follows:
C: Local Disk 130GB/111GB free
D: DoX (just documents and such) 998MB/103MB free
E: AMADOIR (random other storage) 7.02GB/1.08 GB free
F: HP_RECOVERY 10.7GB/1.01GB free

Ok so about a month and a half ago or so I was on a gaming tangent and decided I was going to see if I could go against the grain a little and try to squeeze some extra juice out of this notebook (obviously I was just spinning my wheels) but I did end up finding a new tangent which turned out to be way more time consuming than any game would have been anyways.

I was running the factory installed 32-bit windows VISTA with 3GB RAM, I decided that a slightly noticable performance increase would be worth a complete OS overhaul and I came across windows 7. I couldn't resist. So I swapped out the 1GB card with a 2GB card (now 2X2), burned the 64-bit image of build 7048, and set up my hard drive as it is above. My thinking at the time was that between the HP recovery partition and the backup partitions I had set up for my random odds and ends that I would be covered in a near worst case scenario. (I know better, but ***k it.)

I booted the disk and did a clean format/install on C: and despite the excitement and hype it went disappointingly smooth. No problems other then a random IE tab crash every once in a while which it actually fixes and restores the tab usually before I even noticed anything was going on. Pretty impressive for a beta. The only driver I had to putz with was a missing graphics driver which I was able to substitute with a Vista64 driver until windows recently sent me the new one. Somehow (and this is where it starts to get tricky) they even managed to package all of my program files and windows files into a nice compact 75GB folder which it must have used to string together any other missing drivers during the install. After everything was up and running smooth I shredded it and let it defrag.

Despite the fact that My Computer>Properties still claims that I have only 3.75 usable GB out of 4, I actually noticed a pretty significant increase in complete performance. Wether it was the smoother OS, the 64 bit upgrade, or the increase in memory remains to be seen, probably just a slight increase from each made a nice difference.
Fast Forward: After a month or so of extensive use the whole system was lagging and running like crap even though I was still only maxing out at 45% RAM and peaking 45-75% CPU. I attributed this to a huge variety of downloads with a crappy virus set up while I was waiting on McAfee to get around to it. Last week I found a working beta McAfee suite that set up and ran like a champ, but performance still sucked (I know McAfee is slow, what I mean is performance didn't change). Yesterday I had a couple cups of coffee in me and got to thinking that if the install and supposed "format" kept all that 75GB of windows junk through the install that it probably kept plenty of other junk as well and I decided that it wouldn't hurt to try and reformat/start over with a clean install and a nice virus suite.
This time when I got to the clean install option I clicked a box that said- format all by itself, before I clicked install and the action only took a few seconds at most. I didn't actually think it had done anything until I completed the install and found a bite size C: drive and a couple of "issues".

1- Windows can not find my internal microphone. I installed the factory drivers and it claims that there is no device to "apply" them to, so to speak. recording>properties tells me that I don't have a mic plugged in. Lots of threads on solving sound issues but havn't found near this particular issue. Least of my concerns.... just a clue.
2- I now have a missing driver for an SM Bus Controller and a Coprocessor whichwere not flagged on the previous install and have no useful information, and can not fix themselves.

Individually I could probably fix these issues but I am concerned that I have done some more damage than I planned. After the clean install, performance is sticky and piss poor even with RAM sitting still at 25% and CPU peaking under 40%.
After careful consideration I came up with the evil geneous plan which I though would solve all my problems at once. I got another cup of coffee and decided I was going to hit up the recovery partition and head back to Vista32, clean out all the garbage, and then drop a new clean 7 over that, in theory bringing me back to where I was a month ago, but wiser.

No such luck. F11 is no longer a functioning button at the BIOS screen (still listed during the momentary pause in startup, but not operational) if I hold it down the system waits for me to let go and then loads 7. The closest I have gotten is into the windows recovery center, and then into a command prompt where I was able to change to the desired directory, but I really didn't know what to do when I got there and the only folder on the F: drive was empty. Back into windows My Computer still shows 9.6GB of something on the drive but there is nothing hidden and again, one folder (RECOVERY). Empty.

I have found some good idea's but I think my best move at this point is to look for some advice.
-HP recovery disks (lame and brings about feelings of giving up...)
- This thread talks about manually writing the image over windows and kinda working backwards which I am open to, but this plan is flawed for my situation... empty folders.
-Someone mentioned installing a certain version of Linux which would add the recovery partition back into the MBR, but I know nothing about Linux and that seems like the same situation that got me into this in the first place.

My fear (worst case scenario) is that my original 64-bit w7 install did not format anything or somehow the switch from 32 to 64 was flawed in some way possibly doing damage to the processor causing a slow decay in performance. (maybe the "3.75 usable RAM" is indicating 32-bit parameters ?) no idea if that makes sense.
OR
My most recent install somehow affected the recovery partition and may have wiped it clean in the process.

My question is, is there a way to bypass w7 or build my own boot image which would direct the system to boot from the recovery partition or am I fighting a losing battle?

Thank you if you are still reading this, and I would appreciate any guidance/suggestions you might have to throw out there.




Hello all,

I recently went into my control panel to my printers folder to set up my local printer as default, yet Windows (Vista) always shows Microsoft XPS Document Writer as the printer whenever I print anything (from Word, Outlook, Internet Explorer, etc.). So then I have to go in and manually change it...everyday. Why isn't Windows recording my preference? Unfortunately, in Vista, after you select a printer as default, there is no "okay" or "apply" button, so I just close down the window. Can this be the root of the problem?

Regards,

JMT




I have a laptop with both Vista and XP installed.

I usually only use XP - Vista's there as whenever I call the laptop support people they will only deal with issues if the original OS is installed.

I swap between the OS's by changing which partition is marked active rather than dual booting, as I so rarely go to Vista, and I was in a reverse order OS dual boot situation, which was a pain.

I recently had cause to have to switch into Vista, and took the opportunity to update that installation, with Offline Update. This was a much more traumatic process than it should have been, involving lots of hanging at 0% of step 3 of 3, revoking updates and reinstalling them, but it eventually seemed to work. I was still left with the problem that the computer completely hung whenever I tried to connect to the network, but that's not the point of this thread.

Problem is, when I set my XP partition to be active, it won't boot. I get a blank screen with flashing cursor, or, if I go for safe mode, it hangs halfway through (with the last line showing crcdisk.sys - although I know this doesn't have much to do with anything). I don't, unfortunately, have the recovery console installed, neither do I have a bootable winxp installation disk. I've put the drive into an external USB enclosure, and looked through the system32/drivers folder, but there are no suspicious 0kb files there. I've tried to see if I can run sfc when it's in the external enclosure, but can't seem to find a way to do that (I should say that the host computer I'm attaching it to is a win7 unit). I've run a full malware scan on the vista and xp partitions, and they're clean. I've run chkdsk on the xp partition and no faults are reported. My BIOS is very limited, so I can't change any settings in there (with regard to power management or SATA mode).

I don't think it's an MBR problem as safe mode does get halfway through, and I don't think it's a major hardware issue, as I can still boot into Vista if I set that partition to be active, although I'm not certain about that.

I really need this as an XP machine, so any suggestions as to how I can fix my xp install would be very gratefully received.

Thanks




Hi Everyone,

We recently replaced an old NT server with a new Windows 2003 server for our manufacturing floor. This server provides an Intranet which serves up drawings, specifications, etc. using IIS. All of these drawings are stored in various folders to which we allow directory browsing. However, as you probably already know, Windows XP, VISTA and 2003 server changed the default sort order for viewing files in Explorer. I've found many articles on how to change it back to the old way that prior versions of Windows used, but they've not proven effective for directory browsing within IIS. The steps we've taken ARE effective while browsing as a local user on the Windows 2003 Server desktop, but within IIS, when navigating the folder structure using an Internet browser, they are still unchanged!! I'm not sure if we have to log into the server as the IUSR_machinename account and change the registry as that user. I didn't think you can actually sign in on that account directly. Maybe someone here has addressed this very issue????

I've already been through articles such as the one available here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/319827

Thanks,

Perplexed!




Good afternoon.

II am attempting to install a software program on a laptop that is running Vista. The owner recently installed the SP1 update.

The software program will not install completely, apparently because certain files must be loaded into the Windows folder. I checked the User permissions, and none of the users, including the Administrator, have Full Control of the Windows folder. When I edit the permissions to grant Full Control, and attempt to apply the change, an "Access Denied" message appears, and the permissions change is not saved.

I was advised to install the program using the "Run As Administrator" option. However, this option is not available. Installing the SP1 update did not enable it.

Since the Administrator, long with all of the other users (CREATOR OWNER, SYSTEM, etc.) does not have Full Control, using the "Run As Administrator" option for the software executable file would likely be useless. But it.would still be desirable to enable that option.

1. Is there a way to change the Vista default setting that blocks the user from changing the permissions for the Windows Folder?

2. Is there a way to enable or restore the "Run As Administrator" option.

Thank you.

Kevin




Sorry for the vague subject of this post but that's about the only way I can summarize things. Here's the situation:

Over the past 2-3 days, I've made changes to folders/tasks which don't appear to be being saved. Here's one example: I have a template in my Quick Launch bar for tasks. The shortcut is "C:Program FilesMicrosoft OfficeOffice12OUTLOOK.EXE" /c ipm.task. When I click on the shortcut icon, the template for a new task opens; I fill it in and click Save. Before the past few days, I would always see that task in Outlook the next time I open it. Well, now it's hit or miss -- sometimes I see it, sometimes I don't. This does not give me a warm fuzzy feeling!

Here's another example: When I use the "Send Link by Email" feature in IE, in the past, a new message window would open. Now, I need to have Outlook open beforehand to see a new message window. This only started within the past few days as well.

Yet another example: Yesterday, a new message came into the Inbox and I dragged it (after I read it) to a folder under Personal Folders. I know that I dragged it to the folder yet when I reopened Outlook the next time, the message was still in the Inbox.

So, being a retired programmer, I thought that maybe the pst file had gotten too large and that there were screwed up pointers. I did an Auto Archive, compressed the pst file and reduced the pst file size from 600+ MB to 160+ MB. This doesn't appear to have resolved the quirky behavior.

Short of creating a new pst file and importing everything from the old into the new file, I can't figure out what's going on. It almost seems to me as if changes are intermittently not being saved but that's just a guess.

BTW, my operating environment is Windows Vista Home Premium, SP1.

Any opinions and solutions would be most welcome.




Win2k came before XP, and was technically Windows 5.0 XP came along, incorporated some of the features of Win95, and was Windows 5.1. If I look at the first two fingers of either hand, standing next to each other, the first finger represents Win2k and the middle or second finger represents WinXP. That's how close I think they are.

Now here is the thing. Neither Win2K or WinXP will install on a number of modern PCs.
It may look like it does (with XP anyway), but it won't run. Whether it is the huge hard
drives or whatever, I've tried this repeatedly, on different PCs, and it is a no-go.

But there is a way around this. I install and use a recent version of Ubuntu (a Linux
distro), and then add VirtualBox on top of that. Then I have no problem installing or
loading Win2k or WinXP as a VirtualBox client. Runs just fine, and I don't need to add
a ton of protection software to keep it safe, either. I made up my mind that I was not
going past XP, and in fact was sticking to Windows 2000 as long as possible, because
I do not like the authentication and verification processes that began with XP.

So what's my story then? Well, Microsoft has dropped support for Windows 2000, and
a number of applications that I run under it, such as FireFox, advise me to upgrade to
a later OS. That is not my intent. FlashPlayer tries to upgrade, but there is a process
in the XP kernel that is missing in 2k, so it fails. I imagine the number of separations
will increase over time. And I don't want to mess with trying to install and get XP
registered on a virtual machine. Too many related factors that might be changed in
the future that could cause it to refuse to run.

I'm not going to Vista, Win7, Win8, or Win9. Microsoft has soaked enough cash out of
me over the years, and I am not going to keep feeding it more and more money. When
Win2k gives out, it will be Linux for me from then on.

To help keep Win2k going, I was contemplating putting XP's kernel.dll in place of the one that goes with 2k. I may try that yet. But I thought it would be worth asking in case anyone else has tried it, and see what results they got. The problem with messing
with Windows in such a case, is that system files and some others can't be read or
written to while Windows is running. That can be gotten around with three images of
Windows installed, one to run, one to read from, and one to copy to. Unfortunately,
Linux and VirtualBox do not provide ways to read and write directly to VDI folders and files of the clients that get installed using tools that they provide. The read and writes
are by having a suitable child of VirtualBox running, with the other images chained in
as shared folders.

I tried a google search to see anybody had tried something like this, and the closest I
got was a post to these forums about could an XP kernel be copied over itself, likely from another source. Like I said, it takes three images to make this happen, but the
answer to his problem was something else entirely. Now let's see what sort of
answers my question inspires.

Saying Thanks in advance is considered poor taste, so let's just say I appreciate your
possible efforts to answer my question.

Oh, about 95% of WinXP applications run on Windows 2000. Most of the patches and
such for XP came out for Win2k as well. Win2k takes no registration beyond the code
needed when installing it, and I have found that it is still for sale at different prices
from different sources. One source was $36, and another had it at about $160. Might
be worth looking into. The big challenge might be getting SP1 to SP4, but a way
around this is to go for USP5.1, which was an inclusive set of patches, not all of which
came from Mocrosoft.

a




Dear all,

I am running a domestic LAN (Wired and Wireless) ADSL with a mixture of Win Xp Pro SP3, Vista and Win7 Pro SP1 computers.

Until about 16 January all machines have been able to access shared resources with no problems Except the Vista box which has always required extra permission settings.

Since around the above date I have not been able to browse the network using Explorer, Map Network Drives, open shared folders or Connect to Shared Printers. I normally browse the network using My Computer, Folders Button and expanding My Network Places, Microsoft Windows Network, 'Workgroup', Computer etc.

The XP Machines cannot see the Workgroup computers "The list of servers for this workgroup is not currently available".
On the Win 7/Vista machines, workgroup machines (XP Vista or 7) (with shared folders) are not listed under Network in Explorer.

However, where I have recently accessed a shared folder, that folder remains visible in My Network Places (XP) and when visable, is accessable.

I have noticed a change in the Folder sharing, permissions area. I have set everything I could find to full Access for Everyone with no improvement.

I have dropped/uninstalled all firewalls with no improvement.

There is a Netgear NAS on the LAN and it is working fine. Read/Write etc all good on mapped drives M:, P:, R:, V:, however the NAS itself is not visable in the Workgroup.

Noting the change in Permissions above, could this be the result of a Windows Update?

Internet access is fine.

Please help anyone
Ken




My Vista pc recently gave up the ghost and so I'm now using a new Windows 8 PC. On the email side, I used to use Windows Mail very happily and had many emails filed within its folders.

When I converted to Windows 8, the only (free) email programme I could find which would allow me to import my old emails was Windows Live Mail so, rather reluctantly, I installed it.

I'm now finding it a pain for several reasons and so would like to change to either Outlook (I'm already running Outlook 2002 - no, not a misprint!) or failing that Thunderbird, but so far have not found a way of exporting/importing my emails across from Windows Live Mail.

Does anyone please know a way of doing it - even perhaps using another email programme which would enable me to import my emails and then export them in another more Outlook friendly format?

Any thoughts please? I can't believe it's impossible!

Thanks,

V

PS Even looked at running the old Windows Mail on Windows 8 but even though some people appear to have managed it, it did not work for me. However, in any case, Outlook or Thunderbird would be better.




Hi

I'm really confused about what I should do. I recently wiped my HDD after getting a new box, installed XP then W7RC. When installing XP, I made 2 Partitions, C:/ and D:/. The C:/ drive was ~100 GB on which I installed the OS, and the D:/ Drive was ~130 GB. What I then did was copy the contents of the user folder (My Documents, My Music, My Pictures, My Videos, etc.) onto the D:/ Drive. I set the Libraries to display the Documents, Music, Pictures and Video folders on the D:/ Drive and removed the Users and Public Folders from the Libraries.

Confusing bit.

Should I move the location of the Folders on the C:/ drive to the D:/. What will this do? Will this remove the contents of the Folders on the D:/ Drive? Will it change the icons for all the folders on the D:/ to the ones in the user folder on the C:/.

Also, I read that in Vista, there is a Redirect Option. What does this do and what are the benefits of doing this? Can this be simulated by moving the folders to the D:/ Drive then in the C:/ Drive make a shortcut to the ones in the D:/Drive?

Thanks in advance to any useful help.

Haelbarde


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